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mshoneysucklepink:

beautifulhigh:

bjnovakdjokovic:

neonxwhales:

mediclopedia:
Some of the ways our organs communicate with each other… This is scientifically correct.

I MAKED THESE

Fun fact: my mum had her gall bladder removed a month ago. When I found that comic I emailed it to her. It made her laugh, it made her consultant laugh, and she put it at the front of her medical folder for her hospital stay.

I don’t think I’ve ever felt sadder for a gall bladder in all my life.
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mshoneysucklepink:

beautifulhigh:

bjnovakdjokovic:

neonxwhales:

mediclopedia:
Some of the ways our organs communicate with each other… This is scientifically correct.

I MAKED THESE

Fun fact: my mum had her gall bladder removed a month ago. When I found that comic I emailed it to her. It made her laugh, it made her consultant laugh, and she put it at the front of her medical folder for her hospital stay.

I don’t think I’ve ever felt sadder for a gall bladder in all my life.
Zoom Info

mshoneysucklepink:

beautifulhigh:

bjnovakdjokovic:

neonxwhales:

mediclopedia:

Some of the ways our organs communicate with each other… This is scientifically correct.

I MAKED THESE

Fun fact: my mum had her gall bladder removed a month ago. When I found that comic I emailed it to her. It made her laugh, it made her consultant laugh, and she put it at the front of her medical folder for her hospital stay.

I don’t think I’ve ever felt sadder for a gall bladder in all my life.

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Where my father was tentative and gentle,” Chast writes, “she was critical and uncompromising.” And: “Even though I knew he couldn’t really defend me against my mother’s rages, I sensed that at least he felt some sympathy, and that he liked me as a person, not just because I was his daughter.”

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast's remarkable, raw, relatable memoir of her parents’ aging, illness, and death is nothing short of a masterpiece. 

explore-blog:

Where my father was tentative and gentle,” Chast writes, “she was critical and uncompromising.” And: “Even though I knew he couldn’t really defend me against my mother’s rages, I sensed that at least he felt some sympathy, and that he liked me as a person, not just because I was his daughter.”

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast's remarkable, raw, relatable memoir of her parents’ aging, illness, and death is nothing short of a masterpiece.